Minimum wage in the EU, January 2017

14.02.2017

According to Eurostat (http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Minimum_wage_statistics), in January 2017, 22 out of the 28 EU Member States had a national minimum wage. The exceptions were Denmark, Italy, Cyprus, Austria, Finland and Sweden.

 
Ten Member States had minimum wages below €500 per month: Bulgaria (€235), Romania (€275), Latvia (€380), Lithuania (€380), the Czech Republic (€407), Hungary (€412), Croatia (€433), Slovakia (€435), Poland (€453) and Estonia (€470).

 

Five Member States had minimum wages between €500 and €1 000 per month: Portugal (€650), Greece (€684), Malta (€736), Slovenia (€805) and Spain (€826).

 

Seven Member States had minimum wages well above €1 000 per month: the United Kingdom (€1 397), France (€1 480), Germany (1 498), Belgium (€1 532), the Netherlands (€1 552), Ireland (€1 563) and Luxembourg (€1 999).
In Romania, starting with February 1st, the minimum wage was increased to €322.

 

Compared with 2008, minimum wages in 2017 increased in every Member State having a national minimum wage, except Greece where they dropped by 14%. This trend is dominated by Romania and Bulgaria. Thus, between 2008 and 2017, minimum wages, expressed in euro, doubled in Bulgaria (+109%) and Romania (+232%). If expressed in RON, the increase rate of the minimum wages in Romania is +290%.